it-used-to-be-fun:

Abbi and Ilana are the idols of a largely underserved and under-chronicled female id.”
"Men have managed to get away with prolonged adolescence, on the screen and in life, in a way that women haven’t. “Women always have to be the eye rollers, as the men make a mess,” Poehler said. “We didn’t want that. Young women can be lost, too.”
— Id Girls - the comedy couple behind “Broad City.” (Nick Paumgarten for the new yorker)

(via ssspiralout)

"

But to me, my mother’s English is perfectly clear, perfectly natural. It’s my mother tongue. Her language, as I hear it, is vivid, direct, full of observation and imagery. That was the language that helped shape the way I saw things, expressed things, made sense of the world.

Lately, I’ve been giving more thought to the kind of English my mother speaks. Like others, I have described it to people as ‘broken” or “fractured” English. But I wince when I say that. It has always bothered me that I can think of no way to describe it other than “broken,” as if it were damaged and needed to be fixed, as if it lacked a certain wholeness and soundness. I’ve heard other terms used, “limited English,” for example. But they seem just as bad, as if everything is limited, including people’s perceptions of the limited English speaker.

"
-

Mother Tongue, Amy Tan  (via lullabysounds)

it’s funny because I didn’t realize until this year that my family’s english wasn’t “perfect” and was “broken”. it’s still english to me. 

(via 2jam4u)

(Source: rniguelangel, via 2jam4u)

me: i don't even care. i'm not going to talk about this anymore.

...

me: and you know what else? [2000 word rant]